Types of Cooking Oils and How to Use Them

Types of Cooking Oils

Do you consider yourself to be a kitchen expert? Don’t use the incorrect oil and ruin your talents. Things might become perplexing when it comes to the many types of cooking oils. Because various cooking oils have varied melting points, shelf lives, and nutritional profiles, they cannot all be utilized in the same ways. Even though they are all quite similar, these significant discrepancies might result in a disastrous meal. We’ve included some of the most popular oils and exactly how they should be utilized so you can choose which types of fat you should be using to prepare your meals!

Types of Cooking Oils

COCONUT OIL

These days, coconut oil is a trendy issue for a good reason. Using coconut oil on your skin, hair, and especially in your meals has some fantastic advantages! Coconut oil fats are more quickly converted to energy than other types of fat, which helps to increase metabolism, reduce hunger, and promote weight reduction.

How to Cook with It: Use this healthy fat instead of some heavier fats you usually use to add flavour and improve health. The ideal cooking oil for sautéing and roasting is coconut oil, which burns at a moderate temperature. It enhances the taste of baked goods and may even be added to your morning coffee (often known as “bulletproof coffee”) to add flavour and vitality. Since coconut oil solidifies at room temperature, you should avoid using it in vinaigrettes and most marinades.

EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

Due to its superior quality and ability to accurately capture the flavour of olives, this unrefined oil is a mainstay of the Mediterranean diet. Unlike many others, this olive oil is unprocessed and unheated, and it includes more natural vitamins and minerals.

EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

How to Cook with It: Extra-virgin olive oil may be used for cooking. However, it does have a lower smoke point and burns at a lower temperature than many other oils. Save the best EVOO for dipping and dressing because it tends to be more expensive than plain olive oil, and use the latter for baking and cooking.

AVOCADO OIL

The Matthew McConaughey of oils avocado oil is incredibly versatile and tasty. Avocado oil is formed of the same creamy richness that goes into guacamole, in contrast to many oils extracted from seeds. The anti-inflammatory qualities of this heart-healthy oil aid in the prevention of vascular damage, heart disease, and high blood pressure.

How to Cook with It: Because of its high smoke point and delicious flavour, avocado oil is a versatile cooking ingredient. To make homemade mayo, two teaspoons of lemon juice, one cup of avocado oil and salt, two egg yolks, two teaspoons of lemon juice, one cup of avocado oil, and salt. You may avoid the sugar and chemical preservatives that cause belly fat in this way.

AVOCADO OIL

GHEE

Ghee, a kind of clarified butter, has become more well-known recently as dairy-free diets have grown in popularity. Because butter doesn’t include milk protein, those who cannot consume dairy products may usually eat it. It has a more robust nutty flavour than butter and is a fantastic source of fat-soluble vitamins. Even though ghee is almost wholly made of fat, it should only be used seldom.

How to Cook With It: Use ghee in cooking the same way as you would butter. It has a high smoke point and is fantastic in many ways! Ghee also has the advantage of being left at room temperature as it contains no dairy, making it the ideal toast spread.

GHEE

PUMPKIN SEED OIL

Pumpkin seed oil is a potent meal full of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and vitamins A, K, and E. It might be the ideal accent to a dish thanks to its deep green hue and nutty flavour.

How to Cook with It: Since pumpkin seed oil may lose some nutritional value when heated, it is better to use it for low-heat baking or light sautéing. It works great as the foundation for a delectable salad dressing, dip, marinade, or even ice cream.

PUMPKIN SEED OIL

Almaje/Getty Images

WALNUT OIL

Nutritional properties abound in walnuts. (See our video on the advantages of walnuts!) They include a substantial amount of iron, zinc, calcium, and magnesium and are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. This oil has a deep, nutty taste. It has been demonstrated that eating a lot of walnuts and walnut oil improves how well the body handles stress and lowers diastolic blood pressure.

How to cook it

Walnut oil tastes slightly harsh when cooked. Thus it is best used raw and shouldn’t be heated to high degrees. However, it also makes a fantastic handmade chocolate hazelnut spread. It is a delightful complement to pasta sauces and salad dressings. Add 1 cup of roasted hazelnuts, 2 tablespoons cocoa powder, 1 tablespoon maple syrup, and 1 tablespoon walnut oil in a high-speed blender. Blend until smooth.

GRAPESEED OIL

Although grapeseed oil has been used in hair and skincare products, its therapeutic qualities make it a beneficial ingredient in the food. It is often less costly than EVOO and has a straightforward, nonexistent flavour that doesn’t overshadow other components. When purchasing grapeseed oil for cooking, be sure the label clearly states “food grade.” (You don’t want to unintentionally consume a chemical-filled hair mask!) This is a fantastic source of vitamin C and vital fatty acids. However, be cautious since it also includes a lot of omega-6s, which can worsen inflammation and lead to weight gain.

How to cook it: Because of its extremely high smoking point, grapeseed oil may be used for many types of cooking, including sautéing, frying, roasting, and searing. It’s also a fantastic addition to marinades and vinaigrettes. Caramelise onions and mushrooms in grapeseed oil to make a delicious side dish.

PEANUT OIL

Despite having a solid nutty-sweet flavour and a high-calorie content, peanut oil is low in saturated fats. It mainly consists of monounsaturated fatty acids, which actually work to raise good cholesterol while lowering bad cholesterol. This cooking oil is vital in omega-6 fatty acids and can disrupt the omega 3:6 ratio, leading to health issues. Choose the unprocessed, cold-pressed varieties rather than the refined, bleached, and deodorized commercial peanut oils you often get in supermarkets and fast-food restaurants. Even if the cost may be more, your health will appreciate it.

PEANUT OIL

How to Cook It: This peanut oil may be prepared in various ways and is frequently used in Asian recipes. While its high smoke point makes it ideal for frying, we advise doing a stir-fry with chicken or softly sautéing some of your favourite vegetables in its place.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related Post